— layout: post title: Ignoring Local Files with Git date: 2017-02-04 —

When your are working on a team, it changes some of the decisions regarding things you may or may not want to add to the codebase. If everyone has their personal preferences in a project, it can become pretty polluted.

I often like to have some text files to track tasks and other notes regarding a feature I may be working on. I could add these files to the .gitignore file, but I’m sure I’d be questioned as to why I was adding that. And with good reason. I should only add things that are project specific, not programmer specific.

Turns out, I can have some sort of local .gitignore.

Your .git directory has a lot of stuff. Lots of useful stuff. Admittedly, I’ve never really looked inside. As it turns out, it contains an exclude file in .git/info/exclude

By default, it looks something like this:

# git ls-files --others --exclude-from=.git/info/exclude # Lines that start
with '#' are comments.  # For a project mostly in C, the following would be
a good set of # exclude patterns (uncomment them if you want to use them): #
*.[oa] # *~

Anything you add to that file will be ignored locally.

So, in my case, I want to ignore issues.txt. Adding that line to the file, sets me up.

# git ls-files --others --exclude-from=.git/info/exclude # Lines that start
with '#' are comments.  # For a project mostly in C, the following would be
a good set of # exclude patterns (uncomment them if you want to use them): #
*.[oa] # *~ issues.txt

I can see a potential issue with forgetting that you added lines to that file. For more information, check out the docs https://git-scm.com/docs/gitignore

Use with caution.